ISFP Characters

Artistic. Loner. Special.

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Many main characters are ISFPs. In fact, this type is the quintessential Main Character: morally concerned, willing to take risks, and independent. But one character type for a role gets boring.

Here’s some tips on writing ISFP characters (Fi, Se, Ni, Te).

Fi isn’t ‘Good’

Fi isn’t ‘kind’ or ‘morally correct.’ Neither is Fe, for that matter. Being a feeler doesn’t automatically make you sweet and innocent; the functions you use don’t determine the conclusions you draw, just how you draw them.

Because of this, you don’t need to give your feeler villain a more tragic backstory than your thinker villain. That’s a common theme I’ve seen, but feelers could just ‘choose’ to be evil to the same extent thinkers could.

Se is Se

In ISTPs, Se is usually used for fighting or doing stupid tricks with cars and dynamite. In ISFPs, though, Se is usually used for artistic endeavors (Harry Potter is a good example of a break in that stereotype). It’s the same function, though, and there’s nothing about Fi vs Ti that should show such a great difference.

Se can be used for both hobbies in either type. Give me an ISFP daredevil and an artsy ISTP! And remember: this isn’t all Se is, but these two outlets are often used.

Ni isn’t Always Right

In general representation, ISxPs usually focus on the present but when they become convinced about something using Ni, they’re right. Many people have adequate use of their tertiary function, but Ni isn’t some magical truth-detecting function. Even Ni-doms are often wrong; they’re only human.

Harry Potter, again, is a good example of this. He gets fixated on one idea (Snape’s going to steal the sorcerer’s stone!) that may or may not be right (someone was going to steal the stone… but it wasn’t Snape).

Great ISFP Characters:

Jane Eyre from Jane Eyre; Finn from Star Wars; Rose Tyler from Doctor Who; Sally from The Nightmare Before Christmas

Do you have some favorite ISFP characters?

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